Rainbow Arrow Professional Facilitators











Upward Spiral Ranbow

Website Development by Janssen & Associates

Rainbow Earthfacilitation

Why Do You Need Mediation?

Both mediation and facilitation only work when the parties involved are willing to participate. Sometimes the willingness comes from a consciousness to find a loving solution and sometimes the willingness comes from a desire to save time and money. Sometimes it comes from an understanding that the other methods will provide unsatisfactory results.

The rules of mediation are as follows:

  • The parties are not obligated to mediate. They can stop at any time and go to litigation or arbitration.
  • If the mediator feels that either of the two parties are not willing to mediate, he/she can call off the mediation and the dispute goes back to litigation or arbitration.
  • The mediation is strictly confidential and all notes of the mediator are destroyed after the mediation unless during the course of the mediation the mediator is informed of a crime or criminal act. The mediator, unlike the teacher, is not required by law to notify authorities in cases of abuse.
  • The participants come to their own solutions. The mediator provides and steers the process.

Mediation covers:

  • Potential law suits
  • Neighbor conflicts
  • Landlord/tenant issues
  • Relationship issues
  • Divorce issues
  • Victim/offender issues
  • And more …

The process is the same for all these issues. The mediator need only be an expert in the process and in communication and not in the details of the conflict.

In both mediation or facilitation, it is important that the participants feel heard, honored, respected, and feel that the mediator/ facilitator is completely neutral.

Al Lampell

Facilitator/
Mediator

Tel: (408) 296-0567
Fax: (408) 296-0567

Logo

Training

Business Meetings

Groups

Couples

Facilitation/Mediation

A Course in Miracles (ACIM)

Classes/Counseling

Love/Relationship Seminars

© Copyright 2004-2009 Al Lampell. All Rights Reserved. Top of Page Last Modified: March 13, 2009